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Aggravated Robbery

Many are surprised to learn that robbery is considered a violent offense as the intent for most offenders is to steal, not harm anyone. However, the state of Colorado classifies robbery as a violent offense because the offender has the intent to use force against the alleged victim if met with resistance. The offense is elevated to aggravated robbery if a deadly weapon is involved because the risk of the victim sustaining serious bodily injury rises significantly.

Aggravated robbery is a serious offense under Colorado law and can land you in prison for years. Plus, aggravated robbery is an extraordinary risk crime, which means your penalties may be enhanced even further. If you have been arrested for aggravated robbery or robbery, we urge you to contact an experienced Denver defense lawyer as soon as possible. A skilled violent crimes attorney can assess the facts of your case and build a strong defense.

Aggravated Robbery Attorney in Denver, Colorado

The penalties for aggravated robbery could potentially uproot your life. Not to mention the effect a conviction for a violent offense may have on your employment, future housing, admissions into a university, and the ability to obtain a loan. Instead of agonizing over what to do next, start building a formidable defense against your charges today with Law Office of Matthew A. Martin, P.C..

Theft attorney Matthew Martin has decades of experience under his belt. He’s encountered every obstacle imaginable as both a defense attorney and prosecutor, so he has a unique perspective that may be valuable to your defense. Set up your first consultation now with Law Office of Matthew A. Martin, P.C. and call our offices at (303) 725-0017.

Law Office of Matthew A. Martin, P.C. accepts clients throughout the greater Denver area including Douglas County, Jefferson County, Adams County, Arapahoe County, Broomfield County, and Boulder County.

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What Does Aggravated Robbery Mean Under Colorado Law?

Aggravated robbery is an enhanced robbery charge due to certain factors being present during the commission of the crime. The definition for robbery can be found under the Colorado Revised Statutes 18-4-302, which states a person is guilty of robbery if they knowingly take anything of value directly from another or in another’s presence by use of threat, force, or intimidation. Aggravated robbery is when a person commits the offense of robbery and does one of the following during the commission of the crime.

  • Knowingly strike or wound another with a deadly weapon or an accomplice does
  • Uses threats, force, or intimidation with a deadly weapon and by doing so knowingly puts another person in reasonable fear of death or bodily injury
  • Represent they are armed with a deadly weapon or have an object that resembles and can be used as a deadly weapon
  • Commits robbery with the intent to wound or kill the person robbed if met with resistance

It’s important to note a deadly weapon also has a specific definition under Colorado law. Some examples of a deadly weapon according to the Colorado statutes includes:

  • Firearms
  • Knives
  • Metal tools such as a crowbar or hammer
  • Baseball bats
  • Bludgeon
  • Chainsaw
  • Blow Torch
  • Or any instrument, material, or substance capable of inflicting serious injury or death

Even if you lie about having a deadly weapon, you could still face aggravated robbery charges. The statutes state a person is guilty of aggravated robbery if the victim believes they have a deadly weapon on their person. The charges still apply even if the offender lies and states they possess a deadly weapon or use an object that resembles one.


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Difference Between Robbery and Aggravated Robbery

Although both involve stealing from another, aggravated robbery and robbery have some distinct differences. Robbery involves taking something of value from another and can involve force, threats, or intimidation, but doesn’t require it. Aggravated robbery, on the other hand, always will involve a deadly weapon or the intent to wound, maim or kill upon resistance.

For example, if a person runs and snatches a purse from another, this is a case of robbery. The reason for this is the offender simply took the property from the victim and had no weapon on them. However, if a person pulls out a gun and then snatches a person purse, that would be considered aggravated robbery. Even if the gun wasn’t used or was a fake.


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How Much Time Can You Get for Aggravated Robbery in Colorado?

Since aggravated robbery is classified as an extraordinary risk crime, the penalties upon conviction are quite harsh. Offenses that are classified as an extraordinary risk are labeled so because they represent a substantial risk of harm to society under Colorado law. Since the crimes inflicts an extra risk to human health, the safety of Colorado residents, and life—the sentencing for aggravated robbery is much more severe than standard robbery.

Aggravated robbery is a class 3 felony and is punishable by:

  • A minimum of 4 years and a maximum of 16 years in prison
  • A mandatory 5-year parole
  • A fine of up to $750,000

The sentencing may be enhanced even further by the judge if during robbery or in flight therefrom, the offender did one of the following:

  • Placed another person in reasonable fear of death or bodily injury by force, threats, or intimidation
  • Knowingly strike or wound the victim with a deadly weapon

If the court finds that any of the above is true, the judge will enhance the offender’s sentencing to a maximum of 32 years in prison with a mandatory minimum of 10 years.


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 Additional Resources

Colorado Aggravated Robbery Laws | CRS – Visit the official website for the Colorado Revised Statutes to read up on their laws for robbery and aggravated robbery. Access the site to learn the penalties of robbery, admissible defenses, aggravating factors, and other crimes.

Jury Instructions for Aggravated Robbery – Visit the official website for the Colorado Courts to read the jury instructions for aggravated robbery. Have access to the document given to jurors on aggravated robbery cases to determine how they conceive a verdict for aggravated robbery.


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Armed Robbery Attorney in Denver, Colorado

The penalties for aggravated robbery could put your life on hold for not just years, but decades. Don’t put your future and liberty on the line by not securing the best representation possible. Colorado aggravated robbery attorney Matthew Martin has assisted numerous clients avoid the full statutory penalties of aggravated robbery. He can draw from these past cases to develop a defense designed to undermine the prosecution in an effort to reduce or dismiss your charges.

Call Law Office of Matthew A. Martin, P.C. today to set up your first consultation free of charge. Law Office of Matthew A. Martin, P.C. accepts clients throughout the greater Denver area including Jefferson County, Douglas County, Boulder County, Broomfield County, Arapahoe County, and Adams County.